A Quick Thought on The 2019 Election and The Coalition That Never Was.

I know, I know, I haven’t blogged in a while. I am sorry, I’ve been hustling. The economy is tough but I want to talk about something really quick.

When I went to register to vote in August of 2018, I was either going to vote for Kingsley Moghalu or Donald Duke. Donald Duke had been my dream candidate for as long as I could remember. Then Moghalu happened. His plans resonated with me, I thought and still think they are what we need. I loved the energy he was putting into his campaign, it was the energy Donald Duke’s campaign did not have. The point is I was conflicted.

By January 2019 when I picked up my PVC, I had thrown Donald Duke’s campaign into the dustbin and was in the process of shoving Moghalu’s campaign into the deep freezer. My reason was his refusal to join or force a coalition.

A lot of Moghalu’s plans rest on his ability to get the National Assembly to work with him and for him. Added to this, political realities exist. He’s unlikely to win and even if he wins, his party is even more unlikely to have a majority in either chamber of the National Assembly. If you’re a stranger to Nigerian politics, let me just let you that the National Assembly doesn’t play nice even when the President’s party has the majority.

With this in mind, I thought to myself, if Kingsley Moghalu or any other independent candidate for that matter couldn’t pull a coalition of less than 20 people together how in the world are they going to get a National Assembly to do what they want? To be fair to Fela Durotoye has repeatedly advocated for a coalition but the fact is it didn’t happen. I imagined them going to tell the legislators how they wanted to fix the dysfunctions of Nigeria. I also imagined them getting laughed them out of the room because it’s not in the legislators selfish interest to fix a lot of those dysfunctions.

With INEC saying Oby Ezekwesili will be on the ballot (even though she has stepped down), a coalition is essentially dead. As a matter of fact it’s been dead since November 2018, we just didn’t know it.

So I find myself tilting towards the PDP because the alternative candidates, despite all the hard work they’ve put in didn’t finish all their homework. They stand no chance to win as independents and didn’t show the ability to work with others towards a common objective. It’s very very sad for me and I am hoping some magic happens but I honestly don’t know if it will. If I am being completely honest, I also feel a bit disappointed and let down.

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2 Replies to “A Quick Thought on The 2019 Election and The Coalition That Never Was.”

  1. I was totally disappointed to realize they couldn’t all come together. They were tested in small. They couldn’t unite and pick a consensus candidate(Sacrificing their desire to rule) but want to rule over a 100 million people. To me, it reflects selfishness and that’s not a good quality of a leader.
    Sigh….

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    1. I’m not even concerned about their selfishness, it’s just the fact that they couldn’t reach compromises, they couldn’t negotiate and trade assurances to get the job done. Essentially they couldn’t be political. Although I suspect this is more complicated in reality but the outcome is not what I had hoped for to say the least.

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